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Dec
5
Tue
Exhibition. American Abstraction: The Print Revival of the 1960s and ’70s @ Bruce Museum Tickets
Dec 5 2017 @ 10:00 am – Mar 4 2018 @ 5:00 pm
Exhibition. American Abstraction: The Print Revival of the 1960s and ’70s @ Bruce Museum |  |  |

American Abstraction: The Print Revival of the 1960s and ’70s at the Bruce Museum, Greenwich, Connecticut, through March 4, 2018.

The early 1960s marked a significant turning point in American printmaking: the rise of communal studios provided new avenues for creative and technical exchanges between artists.
Many of the artists included in the Bruce Museum’s upcoming exhibition, American Abstraction: The Print Revival of the 1960s and ’70s, which opens on December 2, 2017 and continues through March 1, 2018, pushed the printmaking media in new and exciting directions. From vibrant biomorphic forms and primitive marks to lively calligraphic gestures and bold color-field patterning, the works in American Abstraction highlight the evolution of abstract art in printmaking during two exciting decades.
These new-style printmakers began to take on some of the responsibilities of publishers and dealers, helping to streamline the production and distribution of artists’ prints. Artists formerly rooted in the solitary studio practices of Abstract Expressionist painting began to collaborate regularly with master printmakers. Some, like Robert Motherwell, even established their own workshops. In California, the emergence of collaborative presses helped to rescue lithography from virtual extinction—which in turn made abstract prints readily available to American collectors.
The American Abstraction exhibition features 23 works by 13 artists. Most are drawn from the splendid gift of Judith and Stephen Wertheimer to the Bruce Museum and include prints produced by Ernest de Soto of The Collectors Press Lithography Workshop and Irwin Hollander of Hollander’s Workshop.
“Thanks to Steven and Linda Wertheimer’s fantastic gift, the Museum’s print collection is home to some of the twentieth-century’s most influential artists,” says Elizabeth Smith, exhibition curator and 2017-18 Zvi Grunberg Resident Fellow.
All of the prints in American Abstraction are from the Museum’s permanent collection, and many are being exhibited at the Bruce for the first time. Also on display is Alexander Calder’s color lithograph Abe Ribicoff (1974), a gift of Barbaralee Diamonstein and Carl Spielvogel; and Louise Nevelson’s Totem’s Presents (1965), an etching and aquatint that is a gift of the “I Have a Dream” Foundation of Stamford, CT.

“Printmaking is often overshadowed by other mediums that artists were working in during 1960s and ’70s,” says Smith. “Art critics and historians of the time debated action painting or minimalist sculpture, but printmaking was seldom discussed in academic circles. I wanted to demonstrate that it was just as important in the development of abstract art through the post-war era and beyond.”
Presented in the Museum’s Bantle Lecture Gallery, this exhibition is underwritten by the Connecticut Office of the Arts and The Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund.

The Bruce Museum is located in a park setting just off I-95, exit 3, at 1 Museum Drive in Greenwich, Connecticut. The Museum is also a 5-minute walk from the Metro-North Greenwich Station. The Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 am to 5 pm; closed Mondays and major holidays. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students with ID, and free for members and children less than five years. Individual admission is free on Tuesday. Free on-site parking is available and the Museum is accessible to individuals with disabilities. For additional information, call the Bruce Museum at (203) 869-0376 or visit the website at brucemuseum.org.

Image:
Stanley William Hayter (English, 1901 – 1988) Eros, 1970. Colored etching.
Printed by The Collectors Press Lithography Workshop, San Francisco.
Gift of Judith and Stephen Wertheimer, Bruce Museum Collection 2011.11.05.

Jan
3
Wed
Photography Exhibit @ Hendrick Hudson Free Library Tickets
Jan 3 – Feb 25 all-day
Photography Exhibit @ Hendrick Hudson Free Library |  |  |

“Moments in Time”
Photography by Michelle Piccolo Hill

Jan
20
Sat
Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War @ Bruce Museum Tickets
Jan 20 – Jun 10 all-day
Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War @ Bruce Museum |  |  |

Saturday, January 20 – Sunday, June 10, 2018. New Exhibition. Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War. Highlighting the variety of approaches that government agencies used to encourage participation in and support for World War I, the exhibition features a selection of vintage posters donated to the Bruce Museum by Beverly and John W. Watling III.

Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War @ Bruce Museum Tickets
Jan 20 – Jun 3 all-day
Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War @ Bruce Museum |  |  |

Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War features a selection of works donated to the Bruce Museum by Beverly and John W. Watling III.

The United States involvement in World War I lasted only a brief twenty months, from April 1917 to November 1918, but the nation’s military and propaganda strategies were of enormous consequence.

Patriotic Persuasion” marks the centennial of American participation in the First World War. It is organized by Kenneth E. Silver, Bruce Museum Adjunct Curator of Art and Elizabeth Smith, Zvi Grunberg Resident Fellow at the Bruce Museum (2017-2018).

Collections, Community & Conversation Exhibit @ Danbury Museum and Historical Society Tickets
Jan 20 @ 10:00 am – Mar 17 @ 4:00 pm
Collections, Community & Conversation Exhibit @ Danbury Museum and Historical Society |  |  |

Collections Community & Conversation Opens- Civil War opens to the public.

Jan
21
Sun
ICC Children’s Classes: Winter/Spring 2018 @ Boys and Girls Club of Greenwich Tickets
Jan 21 – May 13 all-day
ICC Children's Classes: Winter/Spring 2018 @ Boys and Girls Club of Greenwich |  |  |

ICC’s Children’s Classes are a great way for children (ages 4-12) to be enriched academically and culturally outside the classroom! In addition to STEM and coding classes, ICC has added a number of new classes to its roster for the Winter/Spring 2018 session, including yoga, mindfulness, Bharatanatyam, chess, cricket and Hindi. More detailed class information can be found at: http://iccgreenwich.org/sch2018/

Classes will take place on Sunday mornings from 9am – 12pm at the Boys and Girls Club of Greenwich (off I-95, exit 3), beginning on January 21.

Pricing: 1 class is $175; 2 classes are $275; and 3 classes are $325. Enrollment in all classes is limited.

Jan
27
Sat
Hot Art in a Cold War: Intersections of Art and Science in the Soviet Era @ Bruce Museum Tickets
Jan 27 @ 10:00 am – May 20 @ 5:00 pm
Hot Art in a Cold War: Intersections of Art and Science in the Soviet Era @ Bruce Museum |  |  |

Opening on January 27, 2018, the Bruce Museum’s provocative new exhibition Hot Art in a Cold War: Intersections of Art and Science in the Soviet Era examines one of the dominant concerns of Soviet unofficial artists—and citizens everywhere—during the Cold War: the consequences of innovation in science, technology, mathematics, communications, and design. Juxtaposing art made in opposition to state-sanctioned Socialist Realism with artifacts from the Soviet nuclear and space programs, Hot Art in a Cold War touches upon the triumphs and tragedies unleashed as humankind gained the power to both leave the Earth and to destroy it.

Produced from the 1960s to the 1980s, the works on view address themes of international significance during a turbulent period marked by the ever-escalating competition for nuclear supremacy and the space race. Creative interpretations of these key historical events and their repercussions are presented here through nearly 40 works by 17 artists from the former Soviet republics of Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine, and Russia.

The Hot Art in a Cold War exhibition, which continues through May 20, explores the anxious realities and utopian fantasies of everyday Soviet life in the second half of the twentieth century through a variety of media, from documentary photographs and surrealist abstractions to hyperrealist paintings and kinetic sculptures. Kinetic artists in Russia and Latvia directly synthesized art and science in their works, often forming groups to collectively envision and even build immersive installations that offered viewers glimpses into unknown futures.

As science became a proxy battlefield for the struggle between the USSR and the United States, the Soviet space program achieved a long string of successes, including launching the first artificial satellite, first animal, first human, and first space station into orbit. This exhibition features artifacts representing these breakthroughs, including an unlaunched backup of Sputnik, a replica of the spacesuit worn by the first space dog Laika, and equipment from the Salyut space station program. The darker side of this Cold War competition is seen in examples of nuclear fallout equipment and specimens from Chernobyl.

“The Bruce Museum prides itself in being a museum of both art and science and in finding the interconnections between the two,” says Dr. Daniel Ksepka, Bruce Museum Curator of Science and co-curator of the exhibition. “Hot Art in a Cold War is a perfect example of this unique focus. Visitors will see how the triumphs of the space program and anxieties about nuclear arms were captured by period artists. Likewise, many of the scientific objects are works of art in their own right. The elegance of Sputnik, for example, is as striking and undeniable as its impact on the space race.”

“This exhibition is very timely, as we see history repeating itself in the connection between the ‘official’ behaviors of the Cold War and today’s ongoing wars and political conflicts, not to mention the ever-increasing role that technology plays in our everyday lives,” adds Ksenia Nouril, exhibition co-curator.

Hot Art in a Cold War is an expanded version of an exhibition organized at the Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., by Ksenia Nouril, Dodge Fellow, Zimmerli Art Museum and PhD Candidate, Department of Art History at Rutgers. The exhibition at the Zimmerli and Ms. Nouril’s fellowship have been supported by the Avenir Foundation and the Andrew Mellon Foundation.
A majority of the artworks on loan are from the Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union, which is housed at the Zimmerli Art Museum. The late Norton Dodge (1927-2011), an American economist, began collecting Soviet unofficial art during the Cold War, making several trips to the Soviet Union starting in 1955. He amassed one of the largest collections of this kind of art in the world.

Although advancements in nuclear energy and space exploration gave great hope, they also came at a steep price, taking their toll on the Soviet economy, environment, and quality of life. Unofficial artists communicated their desires and fears by reimagining their earthly environments and conjuring unexplored worlds. Hot Art in a Cold War captures the direct and indirect intersections between art and science during this historically significant period of geopolitical tension that remains relevant today.

For support of this exhibition, the Bruce Museum thanks the Charles M. and Deborah G. Royce Exhibition Fund; the Connecticut Office of the Arts; a Committee of Honor, chaired by Jacqueline and Arthur Walker and Deborah and Alan Simon; and media sponsor WSHU Public Radio Group.

Ballet des Amériques Evenings of Dance 2018 @ Ballet des Ameriques Tickets
Jan 27 @ 7:00 pm – Apr 28 @ 7:00 pm
Ballet des Amériques Evenings of Dance 2018 @ Ballet des Ameriques |  |  |

Ballet des Amériques is pleased to announce its 4th annual Evenings of Dance. The company opens its home to the public from them to enjoy performances in its white box theater. Avid and novice dance fans alike can take in the dancers’ performance in this intimate dance setting. Ballet des Amériques uses this platform to educate and cultivate dance enthusiasts.

The performance will include classical repertory by Marius Petipa as well as contemporary works by Artistic Director Carole Alexis. Alexis uses this performance series to create new works and restage existing works on the company dancers.

Performances will be January 27, February 24, March 24, and April 28 at 7:00pm at Ballet des Amériques’ home in Port Chester. Tickets for the performance are $20. Email Shirley Rodriguez at admin@balletdesameriques.com to reserve your tickets.

Established in 2011 under the directorship of French-American choreographer Carole Alexis, Ballet des Amériques, as its name implies, inserts itself into the French cultural heritage of the Americas. Composed of classically trained dancers of diverse backgrounds, the young company has already danced the choreography of Carole Alexis in over 50 public performances beginning with its debut at the Festival de Fort-de-France in Martinique in 2011. As the resident dance company of the Tarrytown Music Hall, Ballet des Amériques is building on the success of its Evenings of Dance series to develop a regional dance audience in Westchester and neighboring counties. With its local roots and international orientation, the company is poised to grow its audiences beyond dance connoisseurs to reach those who have never been exposed to this art and especially young people, in conscious fulfillment of the educational function of dance in the spirit of Maurice Béjart.

Jan
29
Mon
“Worth A Thousand Words” Exhibit at the Maritime Garage Gallery @ Maritime Garage Gallery Tickets
Jan 29 @ 9:00 am – May 11 @ 5:00 pm
“Worth A Thousand Words” Exhibit at the Maritime Garage Gallery @ Maritime Garage Gallery |  |  |

The winter exhibit at the City of Norwalk Parking Authority’s Maritime Garage Gallery entitled, “Worth a Thousand Words” features artists’ renderings that convey storytelling. The exhibit runs through May 11, 2018. The Gallery is located in the Maritime Parking Garage exhibit space, 11 North Water Street in Norwalk, CT.

“Worth A Thousand Words”, curated by Nadia Martinez, features works of art that communicate complex ideas in images. The 32 pieces in the exhibit show artists’ stories, emotions, concerns, memories, and ideas about life, nature, hope, world events, humanity, etc. Exhibiting artists include local artists Day Moore from Milford, Bobbie Bernstein of Westport, Gregory Ziebell of Norwalk and Carol M. Battin from Stamford.

The Maritime Garage Gallery is part of the Parking Authority’s “Art in Parking Places” placemaking initiative, an effort to support art in parking spaces. The gallery is free and open to the public from 9:00am -5:00pm, Monday through Friday.

Feb
1
Thu
Art Exhibit @ Hendrick Hudson Free Library Tickets
Feb 1 – Feb 27 all-day
Art Exhibit @ Hendrick Hudson Free Library |  |  |

Sunset Nursery School Students Art Exhibit
February 1-27
Reception: Sunday February 4 — 1:30-3:00pm
Community Room – Hendrick Hudson Free Library, Montrose